RIP George Romero

george-romero-and-zombieFilmmaker and horror icon George Romero, creator of the modern zombie, has passed away today at the age of 77. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead, released in 1968, completely redefined the zombie genre. It spawned a long list of sequels and many imitators, who picked up the film’s “zombie rules” and ran with them.

George Romero, the legendary filmmaker who changed the horror world forever with Night of the Living Dead and its sequels, has died of lung cancer at the age of 77.

Romero will be forever remembered for his iconic contribution to horror, not just through his birth of the zombie genre as we know it today in 1968’s Night of the Living Dead and its litany of sequels all the way up to 2009’s Survival of the Dead, but for his work on Creepshow, Monkey Shine, The Dark Half, and dozens of other film and TV projects. Romero was still working even this year, recently unveiling plans for a new of the Dead film about NASCAR zombies.

Romero is survived by his wife and three children, and our thoughts go out to his family at this sad time.

George Romero is entirely responsible for the modern zombie myth that has given rise to pub crawls and apocalyptic musings. He invented everything from the slow, stiff movements to the rotting appearance to the craving for brains and the infectious bites. He was a singular, brilliant talent in the horror genre, and he will be missed.

Evil Dead 2 Cabin Wall for Sale

evil-dead-2_cabinHere’s an item of interest to horror movie buffs everywhere. A piece of the original cabin that was used for filming Evil Dead 2 is now for sale on ebay. The cabin was constructed is 1986 for exterior shots that couldn’t easily be done with artificial sets. In 2016, what was left of the broken-down cabin was removed from the property in the woods. And now, if you’re so inclined, you can buy a piece of it.

“This is the actual exterior wall from the front upper left side of the original Evil Dead II Cabin,” the ebay listing says. “In relation to the movie, this piece would have been above the clock and cellar door. The wall is fully intact. It is approximately 16 feet long and pretty heavy.” The piece was retrieved from the woods outside of Wadesboro, North Carolina in April of 2016 by Evil Dead fan Mike Pasquale, who runs the Evil Dead Workshed website.

The Evil Dead 2 production crew rolled into Wadesboro in the summer of 1986. They set up shop in the empty J. R. Faison Junior High School building, where sets were constructed for interior shots of the cabin where Ash (Bruce Campbell) would face off against the grotesque deadites unleashed by incantations from the Necronomicon. The school wouldn’t cut it for the exterior shots, though, so the cabin, as well as the work shed where Ash hacks up his possessed girlfriend with a chainsaw, were built in the woods outside of town.

Pasquale first got in contact with the current owners of the property in 2011 hoping to explore what remained of the iconic filming location. “The owners are elderly people that have not seen nor do they care to see any of the Evil Dead movies,” he wrote. “In fact, when talking to the owner, he walked into the woods to see the site for himself for the first time after owning the property for the past 18 years.”

In 2016 the decision was made to clear out the woods. They planned to remove trees for firewood and drastically change the landscape, which would result in the destruction of the Evil Dead set pieces. Pasquale was given permission to recover as much of it as possible. He spent two days in the woods with a friend for what he called Operation: Evil Dead Uproot, labeling every plank and frame board, dismantling and loading anything salvageable into a 24-foot moving truck.

If you’re interested in owning a piece of movie history, the ebay listing can be found here. The auction ends in four days. The auction description does not mention whether any hungry zombies or remnants of magical curses from the Necronomicon come with the wall section.

Zombie Dating on Twitter

So the critics are wrong – zombies do date, after all! Huffington Post reports that if you are a zombie looking for some action, Twitter is the place to be. There apparently is a whole Twitter subculture devoted to zombie dating.

Don’t let the “looming” zombie apocalypse destroy your dating game. When the walking dead begin roaming across America, hook up with the zomBAE of your life via the #ZombiePersonalAds hashtag on Twitter.

Tonight’s @HashNight is #ZombiePersonalAds powered by @HashtagRoundup and @TheHashtagGame pic.twitter.com/lxQMtSU9O9
— jen marie (@aslowriot) April 13, 2017

You never know, you may discover the drop dead gorgeous living corpse of your terrifying dreams.

Check out the article for some of the best examples of zombie personal ads. Zombie daters may also want to pick up a copy of The Zombies’ Guide to Dining. It contains food and drink recipes for all occasions, like that perfect living dead night out.

Jesus and Judas versus Zombies

once-upon-a-time-in-jerusalemFirst there was Jesus Christ, Vampire Hunter, a low-budget Canadian film that featured Jesus and the Mexican wrestler Santos teaming up to do battle with the undead. Now, the new film Once Upon a Time in Jerusalem takes us to a world in which Jesus accidentally unleashes a zombie apocalypse, and must join up with infamous disciple Judas to put it down.

Variety is reporting that Films Boutique has acquired the international distribution rights to Once Upon a Time in Jerusalem, the feature debut of David Munoz and Adrian Cardona, the duo behind the short film Fist of Jesus.

The film “follows the adventures of Jesus and Judas in a world inhabited by zombies, demons, cowboys, Roman soldiers, mutants, post-apocalyptic punks and all kind of critters. After failing to resurrect Lazarus from the dead, a young Jesus accidentally creates a zombie apocalypse, which Jesus and Judas battle, recruiting 11 mercenaries.”

Check out the new adventures of Jesus and Judas. The zombie apocalypse, and Christianity, will never be the same!

Reinventing the Zombie

The zombie genre has gone through many changes over the years, and the process has really never stopped. This article talks about how zombies became the monsters that we find today in popular media.

You might be thinking that you know all things zombie. You can quote Daryl Dixon lines from “The Walking Dead” in your sleep, and you know that if the apocalypse starts tomorrow, you can best eradicate a zombie by shooting it in the head. But did you know that the word “zombie” didn’t enter the English language until 1871? And it wasn’t until 1929 that the word specifically denoted a person who had came back from the dead? Or what about the fact that in the original script of the 1968 movie “Night of the Living Dead,” the director referred to these versions of the modern-day zombie as “ghouls”?

Here’s the truth about zombies: They go far deeper than a decades-long pop culture trend, as do their symbolic themes of conformity, lifelessness and self-destruction. In the 21st century, it seems to be the zombie that most often satirizes the cultural tendency toward isolation, and reroutes living humans back toward community and a life away from society-enabled obsessions.

Modern zombies are unusual in that unlike most monsters, they aren’t rooted in folklore or mythology. The closest is probably the Haitian zombie, but even there the rotting flesh, craving for brains, and viral or viral-like infection that can be passed on by bites are nowhere to be found. Haitian zombies are alleged to be corpses reanimated by a magical ceremony, and it takes a lot more than a bite to create one.

The article goes on to describe several current books, television series, and films that are reinventing the zombie genre. If you’re fan, check them out!

Ten Essential Zombie Novels

As a lead-up to World Book Day on April 23rd, we present this list from Lit Reactor of ten essential zombie novels that every fan should read. The books feature a number of different scenarios involving zombies, zombie plagues, the zombie apocalypse, and so forth, and taken together give a good overview of the whole genre.

There’s little mention in the summaries of whether or not the zombies in question eat anything besides brains, or if they drink at all. But if they do, perhaps they could take advantage of the recipes found in The Zombies’ Guide to Dining.

Zombies’ Guide to Dining Now Available!

Moonfire Publishing is proud to announce the release of our second title, The Zombies’ Guide to Dining by Moonfire (Sheila Marshall).

This humorous, illustrated guide does for zombies what The Vampires’ Guide to Dining did for vampires, cataloging their personality types and suggesting food and drink to sate their ravenous appetites. Make it an essential part of your zombie crawl today!

The Zombies’ Guide to Dining is now available in Amazon Kindle and Smashwords EBook editions.